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July 2017

Lecture Series: Ray Siemens

July 12 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
S.C.001, Prinsstraat 13
Antwerpen, Antwerpen 2000 Belgium
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Open Social Scholarship and the Scholarly Edition

This talk considers the nature of editorial methodological experimentation, in particular exploring the scholarly edition in the context of open social scholarship. Open social scholarship involves creating and disseminating research and research technologies to a broad audience of specialists and active non-specialists in ways that are accessible and significant. As a concept, it has grown from roots in open access and open scholarship movements, the digital humanities’ methodological commons and community of practice, contemporary online practices, and public facing “citizen scholarship” to include i) developing, sharing, and implementing research in ways that consider the needs and interests of both academic specialists and communities beyond academia; ii) providing opportunities to co-create, interact with, and experience openly-available cultural data; iii) exploring, developing, and making public tools and technologies under open licenses to promote wide access, education, use, and repurposing; and iv) enabling productive dialogue between academics and non-academics. Our example will be the social edition of the Devonshire MS (BL Add MS 17492), the first sustained example of men and women writing together in the English literary tradition, by a research team using crowd-sourcing technologies and operating in conjunction with an advisory group representing key methodological and area expertise.

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June 2017

Lecture Series: Suzanne Mpouli

June 12 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
S.R.218, Rodestraat 14 (via ingang Lange Winkelstraat)
Antwerpen, Antwerpen 2000 Belgium
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Computing Similes in French and English Literary Texts

Similes such as "Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee" abound in everyday language and are generally said to be particularly creative as well as stylistically relevant in literary texts.  In her talk, Suzanne will discuss the specificities and challenges related to the automatic detection of similes for literary purposes. To illustrate the interest of this task, she will present as case study the use of colour similes in a corpus of French and British novels published between 1810 and 1950.

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May 2017

Lecture Series: Tom Deneire

May 15 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
S.R.218, Rodestraat 14 (via ingang Lange Winkelstraat)
Antwerpen, Antwerpen 2000 Belgium
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Digital Special Collections: a Rare Book Librarian’s Perspective on Digital Research

Special collections libraries have by no means missed the digital turn. On the contrary, curating materials that are mostly copyright free and dealing with reproduction reqeusts on an almost daily basis, special collections libraries are excellent partners for digitization projects and digital research. Conversely, this implies that digital scholarship on rare books, manuscripts, maps and prints has a lot to gain from the librarian’s perspective. Understanding how physical objects are digitized, how different items are catalogued, and how to extract data and metadata from library systems offers clear heuristic and methodological gains for digital research. This presentation will discuss such a librarian’s perspective starting from the Special Collections of the University of Antwerp Library. It will explain the library’s digitization process and digital platform, analyze its metadata structure and export formats, and finally offer some research suggestions for data mining and other digital scholarship.

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April 2017

Lecture Series: Peter Robinson

April 24 @ 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm
S.B.004, Prinsstraat 13
Antwerpen, België 2000 Belgium
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How to Make Digital Editions of Chaucer and Everyone Else

The explosion of interest in the use of digital tools for making scholarly editions, combined with enthusiasm for crowd-sourcing, has led to a proliferation of on-line tools for the making of scholarly editions. Transcribe Bentham and similar enterprises promise a scholarly heaven. We can imagine a massive cohort of enthusiastic and skilled amateurs transcribing manuscripts which we, the scholarly leaders, can use to make editions after our own dreams. This talk will question this vision: is this practical? do we have, can we have, tools to realize this dream of scholarly editions made by all? Is this even desirable? And what might we have to change in our own practice to make this vision real?

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March 2017

Lecture Series: Jeroen De Gussem

March 13 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
S.R.218, Rodestraat 14 (via ingang Lange Winkelstraat)
Antwerpen, Antwerpen 2000 Belgium
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The Exalted Expert vs. The Exact Experiment: Authorship Attribution, Stylometry and Literary Theory.

In his lecture, Jeroen De Gussem confronts traditional methods of authorship attribution with more recent computational methods for determining the authorship of a text. He addresses a number of practical and theoretical issues. Take a so-called "stylome", a collection of features in an authors' personal language use which can be quantified as data and visualized in attractive figures. Can computational formalism (or perhaps computational stylistics) capture "style" by focusing on such a stylome? Where does computational stylistics succeed where traditional stylistics have failed, and vice versa? Are computational stylistics as "objective" (or "unsupervised") as they purport to be, or do our results only reflect the answers we were hoping to find?

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February 2017

Lecture Series: Wido van Peursen

February 13 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
S.D.019, Prinsstraat 13
Antwerpen, Antwerpen 2000 Belgium
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A Statistical Approach to Syntactic Variation. The Case of the Hebrew Bible

In his talk, Wido van Peursen shows how combining traditional scholarship with a computational approach permits us to explore linguistic variation in the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament from new perspectives. The Old Testament provides a diverse and most compelling field of study. It has a complex composition history that, according to many scholars, stretches out over a period of more than a millennium. Naturally, this corpus of texts presents a great linguistic diversity. For long, researchers have attempted to understand and explain this diversity in all its facets. The promising results of quantitative methods show once more how Digital Humanities can provide a major contribution to an ongoing discussion; respecting, but also improving an honourable scholarly tradition.

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December 2016

Lecture Series: Erik Kwakkel

December 9, 2016 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
S.A.206, Prinsstraat 13
Antwerpen, Antwerpen 2000 Belgium
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Something Old, Something New: Medieval Manuscripts and Digital Reserach Methods

In this talk, Erik Kwakkel shows how the study of medieval manuscripts can benefit from a digital approach. He presents two case studies: 1) How medieval script is studied in a quantified manner, using modest statistical research; 2) How MA-XRF, an x-ray technique, enables us to look inside early-modern bookbindings, revealing (and reading) medieval fragments that are hiding inside. These two examples will be taken as representatives of two common types of Digital Humanities research: one using digital techniques to do traditional research more efficiently, the other producing results that could not be gained in traditional research.

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November 2016

Lecture Series: Greta Franzini

November 23, 2016 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
S.A.202, Prinsstraat 13
Antwerpen, Antwerpen 2000 Belgium
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Text Reuse, Digital Breadcrumbs, and Historical Data.

In her talk, Greta Franzini will discuss the case studies and activities of eTRAP. This project investigates the phenomenon of text reuse in order to advance automatic detection on historical data. Historical texts pose numerous challenges to automatically detect reuse. These challenges are, among others, the fragmentary survival of works, inconsistent referencing, but also the diachronic evolution of language. Unlike modern texts, where sources are consistently quoted and cited, historical texts are not always so transparent, thus opening up exciting opportunities for intertextual research.

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October 2016

Lecture Series: Elien Vernackt

October 26, 2016 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
S.R.231, Rodestraat 14 (via ingang Lange Winkelstraat)
Antwerpen, Antwerpen 2000 Belgium
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The Magis Bruges Project

In her talk, Vernackt will discuss the digitisation of a famous sixteenth-century map of Bruges, the development of a database, and a collaboration between different parties from both the academic and the GLAM sector. The MAGIS Bruges project responds to a variety of research interests and touches upon different issues within and outside the Digital Humanities community.

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April 2016

Lecture Series: Sabine Lenk and Nele Wynants

April 25, 2016 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
S.D.014, Prinsstraat 13
Antwerpen, Antwerpen 2000 Belgium
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A Million Pictures.

In this double-feature, two researchers present their work on a European project called “A Million Pictures: Magic Lantern Slides Heritage in the Common European History of Learning” – a project that investigates popular visual culture and performativity in the 19th century. Sabine Lenk will go first, presenting her research on 'Digitizing Magic Lantern Slides: Problems, Challenges, Possibilities'. She will be followed by Nele Wynants, who will present her research on 'The Legacy of the Lantern. Artistic Reuse of an Old Apparatus'.

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